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Amoako Boafo, Davido, Amanda Gorman and others make 2021 “Time100Next” list

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Time Magazine has released its second annual “100 Next” list.

The Time100 Next list is released as an extension of the Time100 list of most influential people each year.

Introduced in 2019, the Next list highlights 100 people who are shaping their respective fields in business, entertainment, health and science, sports, activism and more.

This year, Nigerian superstar Davido, 36-year-old Ghanian rising art-world superstar Amoako Boafo, American Poet Amanda Gorman, Dualipa, and others made the cut for the enviable list.

The youngest person on this year’s list is 16-year-old entertainer Charli D’Amelio, who counts more than 100 million followers on TikTok.

DAVIDO

Stephen Tayo—The New York Times/Reudx

Davido is one of the biggest voices in Afrobeats because his music connects with people, often in ways that transcend his expectations. When he released the song “FEM” in 2020, a title that loosely translates to “shut up” in Yoruba, he didn’t know it would become a major #EndSARS protest anthem, as youth banded together to demand the government take action to end police brutality in Nigeria last October. Officials responded by sending politicians to give speeches. We told the government to keep quiet unless they had something sensible to add—the ethos of “FEM” was directly relatable to that moment.You can tell Davido puts 100% into every song he makes. And the results are clear: his album A Good Time surpassed a billion streams in 2020. Afrobeats is a worldwide phenomenon, and Davido is one of many Nigerian artists who has made that possible; now more and more artists, from Nicki Minaj to Young Thug, want to work with him.By bringing Afrobeats to the global stage, he’s paved the way for people like me- By Laycon

AMANDA GORMAN 

“What was the poet’s name?” “Who was that incredible young woman?”

I’ll never forget hearing those questions roll through the audience of the Geffen Playhouse in 2018 when Amanda Gorman stepped off the stage. It was a star-studded Hollywood fundraiser for arts and education programs, a night full of boldface names. But as Amanda delivered her tightrope-taut verse with impossible poise, the room was hers. Sitting in the second row that night, I became a fan for life.

“Who was that?” “What was the poet’s name?”

Those questions ricocheted around the world again on Jan. 20, when Amanda Gorman delivered her original poem “The Hill We Climb,” at President Biden’s Inauguration. If the hardest part of an artist’s job is to fully and honestly meet the moment, Amanda delivered a master class. She spoke truth to power and embodied clear-eyed hope to a weary nation. She revealed us to ourselves.

Here’s the best part: there are so many more moments for Amanda Gorman to meet.

Now the world knows the poet’s name- Miranda,  an award-winning composer, lyricist and actor.

AMOAKO BOAFO

Amoako Boafo is a rising art-world superstar. The 36-year-old Ghanian artist’s work, characterized by bright colors and textured finger painting, highlights Black identity and the African diaspora with complexity and warmth: in the 2020 painting The Pink Background, for example, two men lean into each other as if posing for a photo, both clad in suits and standing before a rose-colored backdrop. This distinctive style has made him one of the world’s most in-demand artists, and won raves from Kehinde Wiley and Kim Jones, the artistic director of Dior Men, who launched a collaboration with him in 2020, making Boafo the first African artist to develop a line with the French fashion house. Perhaps just as significant is Boafo’s staunch unwillingness to being exploited by white collectors now hungry for Black creativity. Amid Boafo’s meteoric rise, his work has often been “flipped,” or resold quickly at a much higher price—a practice that can prevent artists from profiting from the huge windfalls of secondary sales. In response, the artist has fought to establish more control over his work, both by buying it back and through creating a studio for local creatives in Accra. As a result, Boafo has sparked a larger dialogue about who really profits when Black art is handled by white gatekeepers. —Cady Lang

Visit time.com for the full list.

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Medikal granted GHC 100,000 bail

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Ghanaian rapper Medikal has been granted bail by following his arrest on October, 22, 2021.

The court presided over by Mr Emmanuel Essandoh, granted Medikal a bail of GHC 100,000 with one surety.

Medikal was arrested on October,  22nd, 2021 and remanded in prison for five days after brandishing a Ruger 9mm pistol on social media.

Medikal was charged with the public display of arms and ammunitions but he plead not guilty to the charge.

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Shatta Wale, three accomplices granted GH¢100,000 bail each

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Dancehall artiste, Charles Nii Armah Mensah, popularly known as Shatta Wale, has been granted bail following his one week remand in the Ankaful Prison. (more…)

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I have a very funny side – Joselyn Dumas

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Known mostly for her serious roles, Ghana’s on-screen sweetheart Joselyn Dumas is about to bring out her funny side in the new Showmax Original Ghana Jollof where she shares the screen with other fan faves like James Gardiner, Mawuli Gavor, Basketmouth, and Funnybone.

 

We caught up with the Northern Affair star, where she dished on her Ghana Jollof co-stars, her ideal script and who makes the best jollof!

 

What was your reaction when you first heard the name Ghana Jollof?

 

I thought ‘Oh my God, these jollof wars! Can we just declare the winner already?’ Then I got a call from Basketmouth and he said, ‘This is something really special to me, I’m looking for a way to do a proper collaboration between Ghanaians and Nigerians. We’re one people and this is a way for me to let people know that we’re the same.’ So it became a really nice discussion on the phone. I’ve always enjoyed Basketmouth’s jokes and I’ve seen Flatmates a couple of times so I was excited when he said he had a role for me in Ghana Jollof.

 

Tell us about your character on Ghana Jollof and would you say there are any similarities between Joselyn and the role you play?

 

I play Abena, who is an HR manager in Mensah’s bakery. She’s a bit of a senior and has a thing for the boss, Kweku. There’s some rivalry between herself and the secretary, who is her much younger subordinate. So everyone is driving to get Kweku’s attention and Abena feels like she has a bit of an edge because she’s the HR manager.

 

Now I’ve had a crush on a few people but I don’t think I would penalise anyone who is my subordinate because they have a crush on the same person as I do. Healthy competition is nice but I wouldn’t use my position to intimidate anyone out of spite.

 

Tell us a bit about your star-studded co-cast.

 

I’m very happy with the cast. On the show I’ve worked closely with Basketmouth, James Gardiner, Funnybone and Buchi. I just met Buchi for the first time and he’s hilarious.

 

Everyone brought their A-game to the show. We had so many funny moments on set where everyone was just rolling on the floor with laughter.

 

Obviously Basketmouth was in charge of the production so he’s still the boss, but when it’s time for play, he plays, and when it’s time for work he’s quite serious.

 

He’s also made sure we’re taken care of. We had a conversation where he said to me that he realised, while sitting down in meetings, that there’s a lot of disservice that has been done to a lot of creatives and talents in our industry and he’s hoping to make a difference.

 

He’s already doing that, giving all these young people a chance. For instance, the director is quite young and so is the writer and he’s given them a chance to showcase their talent and I think that’s commendable. I also work closely with James Gardiner (Kweku in Ghana Jollof) on Akwaba Magic’s Dede and he’s very talented. He’s eye candy but he also takes the job seriously. Funnybone is my friend whom I’ve known for years. This is his first time acting (in a drama), and he’s doing amazingly.

 

Would you describe this as your first comedic role?

 

Not at all. Everybody thinks that I’m quite a serious person but I have a very funny side once I get comfortable around people. So I’m always looking for that script that will bring out that side of Joselyn. I’m doing that now in Accra on Dede and my character is hilarious without even trying and I absolutely love playing that role. Playing Abena on Ghana Jollof, I’ve had some humorous moments with Basketmouth and Buchi. So I have played quite a few funny roles. People always see me in a serious sense but it’s just a protective guard.

 

What would you take away from working on Ghana Jollof?

 

Teamwork and camaraderie. Everybody was looking out for each other on the set. From the crew to the cast, everyone was hungry to see this show succeed and even go beyond Season 1. That’s what I’m taking away because it’s about time we work together and we go far together. I see that with everybody here. We would come on set by 6am and by 7pm, we’re done. That tells you the guys are passionate and they really want to get this done. Nobody feels superior to anyone; we’re all just equally coming together to create magic.

 

Did you feel any pressure to get it right given that it’s Showmax’s first comedy-drama?

 

Well thankfully I don’t have to say the jokes. But like with every production I do, there’s a little bit of pressure. Even if I’ve done it a few times, it’s always new in a sense. Also, I always feel like everything I do has to be better than what I’ve done before, so yes, I’m under pressure.

 

What do you want fans to take away from Ghana Jollof?

 

I want anyone who watches this show to have fun and be entertained. There’s drama and comedy; a lot of times when you see comedy, there’s a bit of slapstick but I love the fact that there’s drama and comedy with Ghana Jollof. There’s a storyline to it and once you follow it, it’s intriguing. Even as a character, I’m entertained. Sometimes I think ‘Why is Abena doing this? What is her problem?’. It’s also a very relatable series: everyone has had a crush on somebody and everybody has loved the attention they’ve got from people who have had crushes on them. There’s also somebody who has always felt like an underdog. Everyone can see themselves in a particular character on the show.

 

Ghana jollof or Nigerian jollof?

 

Ghana jollof because I make the best Ghana jollof anyday!

Catch Ghana Jollof now streaming on Showmax.

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“I have washed my womb six times” – Nana Ama McBrown narrates attempts she made to get pregnant

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Ghanaian actress Nana Ama McBrown has gotten candid about her journey to motherhood. (more…)

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Jesus Ahuofe, Pastor in Shatta Wale saga granted GHc100k bail

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Bishop Stephen Kwesi Appiah, popularly known as Jesus Ahuofe, of the New Life Kingdom Chapel who allegedly prophesied the death of Charles Nii Armah Mensah (Shatta Wale) has been granted a GHc100, 000 bail. (more…)

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People DM me to tell me my voice turns them on- Hajia 4 Real to critics

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Despite the trolls and criticisms Hajia 4 Real faced  ten months ago when she released her first single, “Badder Than” and announced her entry into the music scene, she has not backed down. (more…)

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