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WATCH: John Canela and Waydon Destin’s emotional and fun experiences from Year of Return in Ghana

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John Canela and Waydon Destin share their wild Year of Return experience

John Brian Canela and Waydon Destin visited Ghana to experience The Year of Return, which marked 400 years since the arrival of the first batch of slaves from Africa to the USA.

The two share their experience of the beautiful country, from Accra to Cape Coast and Aburi on Ameyaw TV. From the cultural assimilation in food to parties, music and more, the two highlighted the emotional and fun aspects of their visit so eloquently and passionately.

Waydon Destin, 28, hails from NY/NJ and lives in Oakland, CA. With parents originating from the island of Haiti, Waydon is no stranger to the culture, which is how he got to connect with influencers in Ghana. He works in tech and in his free time he is either outdoors, watching movies, or looking for a vibe. He also accepts jollof donations year round so show him some love!

John Brian Canela sees his purpose in life as inspiring people to see the light that they have within themselves and to empower them to realize their fullest potential. He currently works as a Security Analyst, focusing on Computer Forensics and Incident Response as a service for companies who have been breached by cyber attacks.

He was born in Brooklyn, New York, raised in New Jersey, and his family is from the Dominican Republic.

“Part of being Dominican  is understanding that we are a part of the African diaspora and are a product of the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade. It’s REALLY crazy to sit and think about it all .It’s why my Dad is white with green eyes and straight hair , and my mom has darker skin with curly hair. Both straight up Dominicans with the same exact culture looking completely different and why I am a mix of all of that. It’s why what it means to “look Dominican” is drastically different person to person, “ comments John.

“Living in Washington D.C, I took the opportunity a couple weeks before arriving in Africa to drive to Jamestown, Virginia where it all started for the United States. As a first-generation in the U.S it’s all just wild to me. It goes to show that what separates an African in the Caribbean vs here in the U.S , is literally just a boat stop”

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